When Breath Becomes Air

During our last session with our Neurology Preceptor, Dr. Alfredo Tan, he mentioned a book titled When Breath Becomes Air. He said it was written by Dr. Paul Kalanithi, a neurosurgeon – just like himself – who was diagnosed to have Lung Cancer and in that book he narrated how he went through it as a doctor and as a patient.

“It was a good read on finding the meaning of life,” he said.

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Since then, whenever I drop by in bookstores, I would ask if there’s an available copy of this book. But I always end up empty-handed. Until one time, maybe a few days before clerkship, I saw it displayed along the pile of books at NBS Robinson’s Manila. I remember how short I was with my money, but since I don’t want to let the chance slip by, I decided to grab a copy then and there. I counted my cash, hoping it would somehow amount to 500php (Gladly, it did! It was at 495php btw) until what was left of me were some coins enough to get to my place.

I initially planned to read it before clerkship starts, hoping it would give me a new perspective on medicine. But the clerkship preparation demanded quite a lot of time and I didn’t get to read it right away.

“I’ll just read it once I have the time”, I said.

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15 Med School Parodies Every Med Student Should Watch

Okay.

Have you ever experienced that time when you are about to just check something on FB and then a few minutes later you find yourself watching a video on how kangaroos carry joeys in their pouch called marsupium? These videos are basically what kept me distracted during 2nd LEs of my 2nd year med. I know, this entry is sooooo overdue. 🙂 #Byegrades

So, this is what med school does to you. 🙂

15. Bohemian Rhapsody

Parody of Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen

School: Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine

14. No Sleep

Parody of No Sleep by Wiz Khalifa

School: Duke School of Medicine

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20 Tips for UERM Med Sophies

See? Now you’re on 2nd year! Congratulations! Whooo! 🙂

Sabi sayo eh, mabilis lang yan. You’ll be a 3rd year med student in no time! And I’ll be a clerk soon. 🙂  *whooo fingers crossed*

So how was first year? 🙂

Typically when asked with this question, students would say,

“Mahirap. Huhu. Grabe, Biochem.”

“Struggle!”

“Okay lang.” *wow*

But hey, you’ve been promoted to second year! That’s one step closer to the ultimate dream of becoming a doctor. Yay! 🙂  You should at least be proud of yourself.

If you’d ask me how my sophomore year was, I would say it was a good balance of fun and work. From my perspective – that is, BSN as my undergrad– I find 2nd year easier than 1st year. This is due to 2 reasons. First, somehow I have already adjusted to the demands of med school. I already had a feel of what med school was like. Only this time, the load really increased but still manageable. Second, I have a background on all of the sophomore subjects. But wait. Don’t get me wrong. Don’t even think I just breezed through 2nd year because honestly, I did not. Haha. 🙂 I struggled, too! Well, it’s nice to have a background and all, but it was still hard, especially the last few months of the school year (more to that later). But yeah, what’s new anyway.

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25 Best Songs of ONE OK ROCK

Want to hear something awesome today? 🙂

Then allow me introduce you to *drum roll*

OOR2

(c) XXTaniaMoritaXX / deviantart

WHOOOO! 🙂

Who are these people?

In 2005, One Ok Rock (OOR), a Japanese rock band composed of Takahiro ‘Taka’ Moriuchi (vocalist), Toru Yamashita (guitarist), Ryota Kohama (bassist), and Tomoya Kanki (drummer), was formed. ❤

What’s with their band name?

In their earlier days, they would do their rehearsals at one o’clock in the morning since studio rentals during that hour was way cheaper. And since there isn’t really much of a distinction between Japanese ‘l’ and ‘r’, one o’clock is pronounced as one o’crock or one o’krock until this became their name, and eventually evolved into One Ok Rock.

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A gentle nudge

It was February 11, 2016 (Thursday) then.

My phone had just reminded me that I have to get out of my bed, start the day and take up where I left off last night – pending documents, unchecked to-do list,  and scattered virgin Pharma transes. I go straight to bed when I really feel sleepy regardless if I have finished the things I have to do or not. This is simply because I know that I can just wake up early in the morning to continue, with ease and confidence in knowing that my alarm clock will save me. Haha. 🙂 This time, I even posted a sticky note on my laptop just in case my memory would not serve me right. With only an eye open, I looked at the time; it was 4:25 am.

Maaga pa.” I told myself.

I then hit the snooze button. And the set times in my alarm clock are those of 15-minute interval. 🙂

“Kulang pa. Huhu. Inaantok pa ‘ko.”

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On the Day I Die

Great reminder for today – that our lives are finite and we have to live every moment to the fullest.

john pavlovitz

flowers copyOn the die I day a lot will happen.

A lot will change.

The world will be busy.

On the day I die, all the important appointments I made will be left unattended.

The many plans I had yet to complete will remain forever undone.

The calendar that ruled so many of my days will now be irrelevant to me.

All the material things I so chased and guarded and treasured will be left in the hands of others to care for or to discard.

The words of my critics which so burdened me will cease to sting or capture anymore. They will be unable to touch me.

The arguments I believed I’d won here will not serve me or bring me any satisfaction or solace.   

All my noisy incoming notifications and texts and calls will go unanswered. Their great urgency will be quieted.

My many nagging regrets will all be resigned to the past, where they should have always…

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